• Blazin’

    Dress Code  

    Photographed in Cambridge, MA

    Noteworthy: blaze orange chinos, red (right) and green (left) contrasting hand-sewn button holes.

    Oct 25, 2012 | Permalink (9) Total Comments

    Smith left a comment on 4/28/2013 at 2:18 AM:

    Any red port left?


    Tim left a comment on 11/21/2012 at 1:20 PM:

    In Australia we refer to port and starboard as stroke and bow (at least in rowing in anyway). Is it the same in the US Fred or is it more common to be port and starboard?


    Al left a comment on 11/21/2012 at 11:35 AM:

    @FEC,That’s fantastic news! When can we expect to see the book in public?


    F.E. Castleberry left a comment on 11/21/2012 at 11:15 AM:

    @Al—Yes…the final stages of portraits are being shot now.


    Al left a comment on 11/21/2012 at 11:09 AM:

    @FEC, Are you still in the process of shooting photos for your book?


    F.E. Castleberry left a comment on 11/21/2012 at 9:51 AM:

    @Jane—I didn’t row crew (I played soccer for my entire youth). I’ve spent the last 18 months in The Netherlands, England, and New England photographing collegiate rowers, Olympic rowers, and world champions for a book.


    Jane left a comment on 11/21/2012 at 9:47 AM:

    Fred, where/when did you row crew?


    F.E. Castleberry left a comment on 11/21/2012 at 9:35 AM:

    @Brent—The red and green is a nod to rowing, in which a rowers right is on the port side (red) and his left is on starboard (green). They use the colored tape to mark which oars go on port side and which oars are on starboard. So the orientation is correct. At Head of the Charles, everyone got it.


    Brent left a comment on 11/21/2012 at 6:09 AM:

    Just a heads up, if you’re trying to have red and green as in nautical navigational lights, you got it backwards. If you’re thinking of the mnemonic “red, right, returning,” that’s IALA B buoys.


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