• Vintage Accessories

    Style  

    Of the handful of friends I have who design interiors, they all seem to echo the same dictum: don't buy all your furniture at once. Doing so tends to capture but a snapshot of an individual's taste, personality, and experiences instead of a culmination of them. I think the same could be said of one's wardrobe. Personal style is best developed over time, a byproduct on the journey of knowing one's self.

    Part of what can make personal style interesting is when certain pieces tell stories or boast history. Whether passed down or purchased, the stories inherent in vintage accessories weave a weft that simply cannot be replicated by new. Carol Troy, author of Cheap Chic, lauds that “vintage gives you a feeling that in this throwaway world there are still some things around that can last ten, twenty, thirty, forty years, or more and remain beautiful.”

    The right vintage accessories can introduce an interesting depth to one's style. And more often than not, no one else will have it. It is now uniquely yours. The key to wearing vintage accessories is to buy great pieces (I love sterling silver) and mix them in sparingly with modern pieces you are already wearing. It is that mix of old and new that feels current.

    “Vintage gives you a feeling that in this throwaway world there are still some things around that can last ten, twenty, thirty, forty years, or more and remain beautiful.”

    This sterling silver American Indian chief ring is a gem I plucked from the Manhattan Vintage Clothing Show. While flea markets, thrift stores, and estate sales are viable options, I appreciate the curated offering of the vintage fair. It is a more organized, curated flea market, with higher quality merchandise (and prices to match). Make an entire day of it. It is highly efficient and beats pin-balling between shops. Nearly all my favorite vintage accessories come from vintage fairs and eBay.

    Since most vintage fairs pop up in larger cities, thrift stores are your next best option. They can be just as rewarding—you just get to roll up your sleeves little higher. Here are a few thrifting tips:

    • The best thrift shops are typically found in wealthy neighborhoods inhabited by septuagenarians (that’s the UES for New York) or in rural towns devoid of hipsters.

    • Don’t be afraid to haggle. I always start at 75% of their asking price (with a goal of making a deal at 80%). If an item you’re eyeing has any kind of damage, go even lower. Long awkward silences only work in your favor. Use generously.

    • Belts, sunglasses, rings and other treasures are often stored in drawers, which tend to be overlooked by most shoppers. Poke around.

    May 14, 2014 | Permalink (0) Total Comments

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