• Boston Ivy

    Style  

    An American musician (D.S.) and an architect (Durga) joined forces in 2007 to make handmade colognes. What began as a hobby making aftershave for friends (they quickly realized none of their friends shaved) turned into small batch perfumes and colognes. The Brooklyn-based husband-and-wife duo reference the classics but with a modern sensibility. They bring a romanticism back to fragrance.

    Handcrafted exclusively in-house using premium sourced ingredients, a single spritz will last you all day. Their method of combining flowers, herbs, spices, oils, and plant extracts dates back to the pre-industrial cottage industries of North America. David Seth Moltz is the nose. He’s self taught. Kavi, his wife, channels her architectural eye into the packaging and illustrations for the line.

    D.S. & Durga Boston Ivy 50mL $106

    I have been wearing Boston Ivy for a couple of years now. When autumn arrives, I reach for it. It’s that kind of scent. Masculine* yet light bodied, unashamedly pungent, reminiscent of the Boston Harbor. In D.S. & Durga’s words, it’s “a memory of Boston in the ‘80s. Where green moss and ivy grew next to I.R.A. graffiti and fresh clover was salted by the sea.” In mine, it’s Cambridge in a bottle.

    * Moltz recognizes we consider scents to be ‘masculine’ and ‘feminine’ because we’ve been socialized to think that way. Violet, for instance, was classically unisex, but now it’s considered feminine because it’s a floral.

    Sep 30, 2013 | Permalink (2) View/Leave Comments

    scaleworm left a comment on 12/11/2013 at 10:07 PM:

    I as well would love to sample these.
    I am a cologne hound, love natural essences.
    Sir and Burning Barbershop sound intriguing.
    Thank you for informing us.


    George left a comment on 12/10/2013 at 10:39 AM:

    I would like to sample this stuff.


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  • Chinese Ginger Jars

    Style | Prep Essentials  

    Porcelain ginger jars, a longstanding favorite amongst interior designers, are rich in centuries of Chinese history and culture, dating as far back as the Qin Dynasty (221 BC—207 BC). The hand-painted jars were long used for storing rare spices such as salt, herbs, and ginger (hence the name). In the 17th century, the British began exporting these porcelain wares and called them “china.” Showcasing these pieces in one’s home during this time came to symbolize wealth, sophistication, and travel. Today, designers are often creating an elevated high/low approach with these beautiful blue-and-white pieces.

    The key is to not be too precious with them. Make them functional. Convert them into lamps or flower pots. Here, I store my croquet set in a large 20” jar but your umbrellas could be just as fitting. My friend Mariah, the equine lover behind Quite Continental, displays polo mallets in hers. The floral patterns and bulbous hand-painted body introduce a subtle femininity to a room. Larger antique Chinese porcelain ginger jars can still be found for upwards of $600; however, they will typically show heavy signs of wear and tear and are often very fragile. New reproductions, ideal for decorating and re-purposing, can be had for a fraction of the cost at shops like Etsy and Pearl River. It’s about the mix—Chinese ginger jars with Persian rugs with mid-century modern Bertoia chairs.

    Sep 27, 2013 | Permalink (11) View/Leave Comments

    F.E. Castleberry left a comment on 11/5/2013 at 12:17 PM:

    @Chase—I’m currently in a three bedroom apartment.


    Chase left a comment on 11/5/2013 at 12:11 PM:

    Are you in a studio apartment in South Slope?


    Margaret left a comment on 11/5/2013 at 10:46 AM:

    I’ve been away from this site for a few months - any update on the online retail shop? coffee table rowing book? etc.?


    F.E. Castleberry left a comment on 11/5/2013 at 10:44 AM:

    @James—If you’d like to continue this conversation, just email me.


    James left a comment on 11/5/2013 at 10:43 AM:

    You’ve had one up until recently, yes?


    F.E. Castleberry left a comment on 11/5/2013 at 10:41 AM:

    @James—I could be open to the possibility.


    James left a comment on 11/5/2013 at 10:39 AM:

    Are you looking for a roommate?


    F.E. Castleberry left a comment on 11/5/2013 at 10:27 AM:

    @James—At the moment, yes.


    James left a comment on 11/5/2013 at 10:22 AM:

    Do you live by yourself?


    F.E. Castleberry left a comment on 11/4/2013 at 4:16 PM:

    @Grace—Only a year or so. There is a club that plays in Central Park every summer.


    Grace left a comment on 11/4/2013 at 4:11 PM:

    How long have you played croquet?


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  • The Wes Anderson Collection

    Music & Books  

    Abrams Books just released Matt Zoller Seitz’s The Wes Anderson Collection, the first in-depth overview of Anderson’s filmography. The coffee table book showcases the creative process of one of the most influential voices from the past two decades of American cinema. It is chock full of never-before-seen photos, behind the scenes notes, original illustrations, and ephemera, all centered around a book-length conversation between the director and Seitz (the foremost critic on Anderson’s work).

    Seitz is not one to shy away from pulling back the curtain on Anderson’s sources. In fact, Seitz goes in depth in analyzing what exactly influenced what in the director’s evolving signature style. Below you can see exactly how The Royal Tennenbaums was informed by Orson Welles’ Citizen Kane.

    It is Francis Ford Coppola who says, “We want you to take from us. We want you, at first, to steal from us, because you can’t steal. You will take what we give you and you will put it in your own voice. And that’s how you begin. And then one day someone will steal from you.”

    Watch the trailer below as Seitz guides you through his approach and structure of what is sure to be one of the most visually intimate books of its kind.

    Sep 25, 2013 | Permalink (1) View/Leave Comments

    Leith left a comment on 10/31/2013 at 3:40 PM:

    How did people survive pre-Wes Anderson?  Honestly.  This book is definitely going to be a part of my collection.  Thank you.  - Leith
    http://outsidelanddiaries.blogspot.com


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  • Salt of the Earth

    Dress Code  

    Photographed in Boston, MA

    Noteworthy: Philip runs a shop in the Sound End of Boston by the name of Sault New England. He carries curated vintage and a collection of men's clothing, accessories, stationery, and home goods of a style that's classic New England. When I stopped in last week, I couldn't help but pick up a few things—he'd merchandised it so well. Check out his Instagram account for a peek into his ever evolving product assortment. He's good people.

    Sep 23, 2013 | Permalink (2) View/Leave Comments

    F.E. Castleberry left a comment on 10/25/2013 at 1:20 PM:

    @Alexander—I’m going to let you discover everything for yourself. Ask Philip questions about the merchandise…that’s the best way to experience his shop. Have fun.


    Alexander left a comment on 10/25/2013 at 1:16 PM:

    Well I guess I know where I’m going this weekend. Thanks for the heads up. Any sweet pieces to keep an eye out for?


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  • Pins and Tears

    Miscellany  

    If you haven't stopped by Collection lately, my ongoing curation of image tears, quotes, and original photographs, pop in (on something other than your iPhone) for a peek into what's been inspiring me this fall. You might just find yourself...inspired.

    Sep 20, 2013 | Permalink (1) View/Leave Comments

    Rooster left a comment on 11/3/2013 at 12:49 AM:

    Your Pins and Tears collection is beautiful. You obviously put a lot of time in the selections. Did you do any of the art work? I hope more of your readers catch it. I almost passed it by.


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