• Shoptalk Radio Interview

    Style | Miscellany  

    Nick Onken and I first met when I hired him to shoot branding images for my photography business. That was 2008. Fast forward to 2014 and not only have we become great friends but for much of that time, Nick served as one of my creative mentors. For that I am forever grateful. He possesses a youthful way of looking at the world in front of him—a unique blend of music, community, food, and pop culture.

    One thing I love about Nick is that the guy has a big heart. He is genuinely interested in people. In an effort to give back and inspire, he recently created a podcast that explores the entrepreneurial journeys of creatives he has personally come to know over the years. He’s interviewed over a dozen friends who are are up to big things in their lives—music moguls, dancers, non-profits, actors, and fashion designers—all living a unique and inspiring story. I listen on a regular basis and always walk away inspired to continue pursuing my own vision. When Nick recently asked to sit down with me, I was honored to dive into my own creative journey and look back at exactly how I got from there to here.

    You can listen here and check out the rest of the photo story Nick created. It’s a a real treat being shot by Nick…so of course I had to pogo around SoHo.

    Mar 25, 2014 | Permalink (6) View/Leave Comments

    610 left a comment on 5/11/2014 at 2:02 PM:

    This is amazing! I’ve started to follow your blog a couple of years ago. Back then I did not really care how I dressed, I did however love to go in here and look at the pictures. since my passion for style came way later than this I never took my time to read any of the posts. Now a couple of years later, after moving to London and working in the sartorial end of retail I realise what I have missed.

    Shame on me.


    ali left a comment on 4/23/2014 at 9:50 PM:

    What a great collection of photos. I wanted to pint out that I noticed your pogo stick was the standard issue silver color. Was it monogrammed? I could not tell. I am so sorry that you cannot find any pants that have the right inseam for you. Your poor feet must be so very cold.


    Cate left a comment on 4/17/2014 at 11:18 PM:

    great photos, great piece on nick’s site.


    Joey Dee left a comment on 4/8/2014 at 5:23 PM:

    Dear Fred:
    Your site & style will always be an inspiration! The content is always refreshing!
    Joey Dee


    Lauren left a comment on 3/31/2014 at 5:52 PM:

    Love your site!


    Jen K. left a comment on 3/26/2014 at 8:42 AM:

    That is so awesome! I’ve followed Nick’s blog for awhile!


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  • The Wagon and the Road

    Miscellany  

    At the time I dreaded it. I had better things to do with my summers, like pump my best friend to the comic book shop, watch CHiPs, and build forts in the creek behind my backyard. It was the early 90s and my parents were very much into road trips. The more states the better. The combination of economy travel for five, around-the-clock sightseeing, and an ‘87 Mercedes-Benz diesel wagon made it the sensible choice to satisfy what wanderlust my parents needed to pacify.

    There is something very American about the road trip. Given our love affair with cars, it's no wonder. The 47,000+ miles of interstate highway, National Monuments, and roadside eats have made it about the journey, not simply the destination. Castleberry family road trips were no exception. Our destination was always home…with one caveat: never return the way you came. To drive in a huge loop was completely normal. In the summer of 1993 we circled the American Southwest...Sequoia National Park, the Grand Canyon, Delicate Arch in Utah—we hit it all in a week.

    The trips never came at a convenient break in the summers though. Occasionally, I'd enlist a friend from the neighborhood to join the circus come along. They never knew it but they were the buffer and served a very specific purpose. After all, I couldn’t think of anything worse than being cooped up with my younger brother and sister for nine hour stretches while dad threatened to pull the car over every other rest stop. My one reprieve was throwing my feet out the window and watching the world fly by.

    Today, I actually find myself pining for those road trips. Nostalgia seems to do that—romanticize our memories. My brother and sister now live overseas, sadly, and I rarely see them. Over the weekend, I found my way into the backseat again as spring hesitantly stepped out from behind winter's shadow. I just laid there. In the relative quiet, I propped my feet out the window, closed my eyes, and let the warmth of the sun take me back to that summer in ’93.

    Mar 13, 2014 | Permalink (3) View/Leave Comments

    Richard Ross left a comment on 3/18/2014 at 11:17 PM:

    I sure do love road trips. Our family road trip rule was that we couldn’t eat at chain restaurants. Only “road food”, as my dad would call it. I still apply that rule to my road trips with friends.


    Lee Emerson left a comment on 3/17/2014 at 8:09 AM:

    Road trips are big in Australia too. There’s something mesmerizing about them - like getting lost in time…


    scaleworm left a comment on 3/16/2014 at 10:02 PM:

    memories are always nice.
    thank you for sharing.


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