• Ask the Experts: Bomber Jackets

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    I recently sat down with Mr. Porter for their Ask the Experts series to talk about the past and present of our favorite jacket of the season: the bomber. Be sure to check out what Sam Lobban, Chris Sullivan, and Christopher Raeburn have to say as well. I'm honored to be in such good company.

    Oct 16, 2013 | Permalink (4) View/Leave Comments

    Al left a comment on 11/20/2013 at 12:12 AM:

    Solid work, Fred. Very articulate and informative. I enjoyed your ideas on that pairing of preppy and rugged material/fabric for a classically-inspired, but also modern look.


    M Arthur left a comment on 11/19/2013 at 10:22 PM:

    A very thoughtful take on the bomber Fred.  You may understandably be honored to be among the other chaps, but you certainly held you own.


    Roger C. Russell II left a comment on 11/19/2013 at 8:54 PM:

    This was very well done. I’m glad there is a renewed interest in bomber jackets. Also, it is great that sheep and lamb options were mentioned. I think a lot of people miss the true functionality of the jacket if they don’t choose these materials. The cowhide is not authentic military issue, and it can be a bad choice on a cold day.


    Bess left a comment on 11/19/2013 at 6:35 PM:

    very articulate…i enjoyed this!


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  • Boston Ivy

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    An American musician (D.S.) and an architect (Durga) joined forces in 2007 to make handmade colognes. What began as a hobby making aftershave for friends (they quickly realized none of their friends shaved) turned into small batch perfumes and colognes. The Brooklyn-based husband-and-wife duo reference the classics but with a modern sensibility. They bring a romanticism back to fragrance.

    Handcrafted exclusively in-house using premium sourced ingredients, a single spritz will last you all day. Their method of combining flowers, herbs, spices, oils, and plant extracts dates back to the pre-industrial cottage industries of North America. David Seth Moltz is the nose. He’s self taught. Kavi, his wife, channels her architectural eye into the packaging and illustrations for the line.

    D.S. & Durga Boston Ivy 50mL $106

    I have been wearing Boston Ivy for a couple of years now. When autumn arrives, I reach for it. It’s that kind of scent. Masculine* yet light bodied, unashamedly pungent, reminiscent of the Boston Harbor. In D.S. & Durga’s words, it’s “a memory of Boston in the ‘80s. Where green moss and ivy grew next to I.R.A. graffiti and fresh clover was salted by the sea.” In mine, it’s Cambridge in a bottle.

    * Moltz recognizes we consider scents to be ‘masculine’ and ‘feminine’ because we’ve been socialized to think that way. Violet, for instance, was classically unisex, but now it’s considered feminine because it’s a floral.

    Sep 30, 2013 | Permalink (2) View/Leave Comments

    scaleworm left a comment on 12/11/2013 at 10:07 PM:

    I as well would love to sample these.
    I am a cologne hound, love natural essences.
    Sir and Burning Barbershop sound intriguing.
    Thank you for informing us.


    George left a comment on 12/10/2013 at 10:39 AM:

    I would like to sample this stuff.


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  • Chinese Ginger Jars

    Style | Prep Essentials  

    Porcelain ginger jars, a longstanding favorite amongst interior designers, are rich in centuries of Chinese history and culture, dating as far back as the Qin Dynasty (221 BC—207 BC). The hand-painted jars were long used for storing rare spices such as salt, herbs, and ginger (hence the name). In the 17th century, the British began exporting these porcelain wares and called them “china.” Showcasing these pieces in one’s home during this time came to symbolize wealth, sophistication, and travel. Today, designers are often creating an elevated high/low approach with these beautiful blue-and-white pieces.

    The key is to not be too precious with them. Make them functional. Convert them into lamps or flower pots. Here, I store my croquet set in a large 20” jar but your umbrellas could be just as fitting. My friend Mariah, the equine lover behind Quite Continental, displays polo mallets in hers. The floral patterns and bulbous hand-painted body introduce a subtle femininity to a room. Larger antique Chinese porcelain ginger jars can still be found for upwards of $600; however, they will typically show heavy signs of wear and tear and are often very fragile. New reproductions, ideal for decorating and re-purposing, can be had for a fraction of the cost at shops like Etsy and Pearl River. It’s about the mix—Chinese ginger jars with Persian rugs with mid-century modern Bertoia chairs.

    Sep 27, 2013 | Permalink (11) View/Leave Comments

    F.E. Castleberry left a comment on 11/5/2013 at 12:17 PM:

    @Chase—I’m currently in a three bedroom apartment.


    Chase left a comment on 11/5/2013 at 12:11 PM:

    Are you in a studio apartment in South Slope?


    Margaret left a comment on 11/5/2013 at 10:46 AM:

    I’ve been away from this site for a few months - any update on the online retail shop? coffee table rowing book? etc.?


    F.E. Castleberry left a comment on 11/5/2013 at 10:44 AM:

    @James—If you’d like to continue this conversation, just email me.


    James left a comment on 11/5/2013 at 10:43 AM:

    You’ve had one up until recently, yes?


    F.E. Castleberry left a comment on 11/5/2013 at 10:41 AM:

    @James—I could be open to the possibility.


    James left a comment on 11/5/2013 at 10:39 AM:

    Are you looking for a roommate?


    F.E. Castleberry left a comment on 11/5/2013 at 10:27 AM:

    @James—At the moment, yes.


    James left a comment on 11/5/2013 at 10:22 AM:

    Do you live by yourself?


    F.E. Castleberry left a comment on 11/4/2013 at 4:16 PM:

    @Grace—Only a year or so. There is a club that plays in Central Park every summer.


    Grace left a comment on 11/4/2013 at 4:11 PM:

    How long have you played croquet?


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  • Boast for Tretorn

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    Green Camo Tretorn Sneaker*, $90

    Tretorn's Nylite has been enjoying a moment in menswear if there ever was one. Just when you think its 15 minutes are up, a fresh take on the Swedish unisex tennis shoe is born. While Tretorn has been granting creative license of their storied Nylite canvas sneaker to the likes of Sid Mashburn, J.Crew, White Mountaineering, Club Monaco, and J. Press, no collaboration was as inevitable as Boast. Given both their tennis rich origins, it feels natural. It feels good. And no one has quite done what Boast did for this fall: an all-over print. Faintly reminiscent of Liberty of London florals save for the employment of the brand's irreverent Japanese maple leaf. This camo color way, with accents of tennis ball neon, pairs well with your khaki, olive, and brown chinos/cords of autumn. Keep the rest of your rig relatively quiet and it's game, set, match.

    *courtesy of Boast

    Sep 16, 2013 | Permalink (6) View/Leave Comments

    Feroz left a comment on 3/22/2014 at 2:16 AM:

    I’ve been wearing a pair of navy Vans Authentics.  I kinda suriprsed myself by buying them really as they’re not something I would generally wear, but as I get a little older I find myself more willing to branch away from the curriculum if you will.  So yea, Vans Authentics are awesome.


    F.E. Castleberry left a comment on 10/23/2013 at 3:11 PM:

    @Palmer Woodrow (funny)—Both shoes fit true to size. The Nylites are much more comfortable. Also, I’ve noticed Converse has continued to cut costs on the Jack Purcell, this decreasing the quality and attention to detail once present in the iconic canvas sneaker.


    Palmer Woodrow left a comment on 10/22/2013 at 6:05 PM:

    Cool collaboration, I’ll be ordering myself a pair. Fred, how would compare the fit of Nylites to Jack Purcells?


    F.E. Castleberry left a comment on 10/22/2013 at 11:49 AM:

    @Fred—That is what “*courtesy of Boast” means…I’ve disclosed that fact that they were gifted to me. The endorsement is authentic here despite being gifted the shoes. I’m a fan of these.


    Fred left a comment on 10/22/2013 at 11:45 AM:

    Were these gifted to you?


    George left a comment on 10/21/2013 at 3:16 PM:

    I recall when Tretorn was the “it” shoe to have in certain circles many years ago. I’m glad they’re still around and wish them continued success. It’s nice to have choices beyond…well, the usual names, you know?


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  • JFK Wore Chucks

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    In all the photographs I've come across of John F. Kennedy (I own enough coffee table books on the Kennedys to warrant an intervention), I've seen him running around in penny loafers, boat shoes, plimsoles, and white bucks. Never have I seen him in Chuck Taylors. Until now. Here, crossing a street in Georgetown, he's wearing just that, a pair in the original hi-top model. His inseam, cuff, sweatshirt...unapologetically collegiate, distinctly American.

    Sep 13, 2013 | Permalink (4) View/Leave Comments

    Roger C. Russell II left a comment on 10/23/2013 at 5:57 PM:

    I really like the image that Jack and the young woman with the over-sized sweater portyay. They convey clean conservative quality.


    Meg left a comment on 10/20/2013 at 4:31 PM:

    I second PSP’s comment.  Martin’s makes a mean burger.


    OMK left a comment on 10/18/2013 at 11:54 AM:

    Fantastic! I too am an avid fan of Jack Kennedy.


    PSP left a comment on 10/17/2013 at 6:04 PM:

    FE, If you are that big of a fan, next time you are in G Town, Check out Martin’s Tavern.  You can still sit in the “rumble seat” where JFK ate on Sundays.  He also got engaged to Jackie at an adjacent table. The food is also great.  I go whenever I am in Bethesda for the reserves.
    Chucks never go out of style.


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